Retirement Home Options at a Glance

Preparing your search of retirement homes

Whether you are searching with an assistant or doing the initial footwork by searching the internet for a retirement home, you’ll need to have an idea of the area you want to live in and more importantly, the type of retirement community that will suit you best.

Types of retirement communities

To add some clarity and help you in the decision making process, I’ve outlined a brief overview of the types of care available in Canada and more specifically, the levels of care commonly provided at retirement communities.

Active Retirement Communities

The active retirement community is also known as the active adult community, 55-plus living and resort community. They are usually age-exclusive from 55+, 60+ and sometimes 65+ but there are also communities that are not age restrictive. Active retirement communities may be gated with on-site security and sometimes health-care. The active retirement lifestyle appeals to baby-boomers and seniors moving into the early phase of retirement or semi-retirement and who are still very independent, wishing to retain control over most aspects of their lives.

Assisted Living

Assisted living communities are suited to individuals that require assistance with certain daily activities but are still able to live independently. Typical assisted living units range from private rooms to apartment style self-contained suites with private washroom and cooking facilities. There is usually a common dining room where residents can socialize and have meals together.

Assisted living communities NDSI Providers including housekeeping, meals, laundry, recreational and social opportunities plus 24-hour emergency response. Individuals needing an assisted living community are usually able to choose the services that they require and make decisions on their own behalf regarding their care.

Independent Living

The independent style of living as it applies to seniors usually offers one or more services to assist the individual with daily life tasks. The resident retains their independence and has the choice of services that they desire assistance with.

Independent Living is also known in Canada as Supportive Living; in a Supportive Living community, the service provider does not have the same obligation to provide specific services as in an Assisted Living community and they generally have established criteria as far as the services they offer.

If you are considering an Independent Living community, it’s important that you get an outline of the services provided, the available staffing, and ask whether you are free to obtain a higher level of care in this community should your health warrant it, or if you will be obligated to move.

Campuses of Care

Also known as ‘aging in place’, a Campus of Care is the ideal setting for those that know their level of care will change in time. At a campus of care you will be secure knowing that when you need to transition from independence to assisted living to long-term care, you will be able to remain where you are.

Specialized Levels of Care

Additional types of care including long term care and Alzheimer’s care are also available in many areas of the city of Toronto. To narrow down your options where a specialized level of care is required, start at the SeniorsZen Home Page, and then browse by Care Type.

Retirement Home Options at a Glance

Preparing your search of retirement homes

Whether you are searching with an assistant or doing the initial footwork by searching the internet for a retirement home, you’ll need to have an idea of the area you want to live in and more importantly, the type of retirement community that will suit you best.

Types of retirement communities

To add some clarity and help you in the decision making process, I’ve outlined a brief overview of the types of care available in Canada and more specifically, the levels of care commonly provided at retirement communities.

Active Retirement Communities

The active retirement community is also known as the active adult community, 55-plus living and resort community. They are usually age-exclusive from 55+, 60+ and sometimes 65+ but there are also communities that are not age restrictive. Active retirement communities may be gated with on-site security and sometimes health-care. The active retirement lifestyle appeals to baby-boomers and seniors moving into the early phase of retirement or semi-retirement and who are still very independent, wishing to retain control over most aspects of their lives.

Assisted Living

Assisted living communities are suited to individuals that require assistance with certain daily activities but are still able to live independently. Typical assisted living units range from private rooms to apartment style self-contained suites with private washroom and cooking facilities. There is usually a common dining room where residents can socialize and have meals together.

Assisted living communities NDSI Providers including housekeeping, meals, laundry, recreational and social opportunities plus 24-hour emergency response. Individuals needing an assisted living community are usually able to choose the services that they require and make decisions on their own behalf regarding their care.

Independent Living

The independent style of living as it applies to seniors usually offers one or more services to assist the individual with daily life tasks. The resident retains their independence and has the choice of services that they desire assistance with.

Independent Living is also known in Canada as Supportive Living; in a Supportive Living community, the service provider does not have the same obligation to provide specific services as in an Assisted Living community and they generally have established criteria as far as the services they offer.

If you are considering an Independent Living community, it’s important that you get an outline of the services provided, the available staffing, and ask whether you are free to obtain a higher level of care in this community should your health warrant it, or if you will be obligated to move.

Campuses of Care

Also known as ‘aging in place’, a Campus of Care is the ideal setting for those that know their level of care will change in time. At a campus of care you will be secure knowing that when you need to transition from independence to assisted living to long-term care, you will be able to remain where you are.

Specialized Levels of Care

Additional types of care including long term care and Alzheimer’s care are also available in many areas of the city of Toronto. To narrow down your options where a specialized level of care is required, start at the SeniorsZen Home Page, and then browse by Care Type.